About

This page is simply about my story as a young dad living with CAD (Coronary Artery Disease). My purpose for this website is to share my stories, thoughts and findings to the world. I was recently diagnosed with CAD at the age of 33, and alongside my beautiful wife, we have two young children. Being diagnosed with heart disease as a young father has brought about many emotions, fears, uncertainties, realizations and education opportunities.I simply hope to share those with others that may be in a similar position, or perhaps anyone that seeks to understand and potentially prevent heart disease for themselves or those that they love. I am not a doctor and have no medical background. These are simply my experiences, findings and stories as a DAD with CAD.

After being diagnosed with CAD, I began researching the internet, looking for other young adults that had a similar experience. I was seeking hope, inspiration, and most importantly information. What I found was that if I was 60-90 years old, there was endless information about those living with heart disease. What I didn’t find was much information for a 33 year old husband and father of two young children living with (and fearing) the future of a life with coronary artery disease. So, this blog is my attempt at helping other young adults that may be faced with a similar situation. I hope to appeal not just to young dads, but to all young adults who may be faced with a future of living with heart disease.

If you have read this far, I simply thank you for taking the time to learn about my purpose for this site. If you continue to read my blog, I hope that you find it insightful, educational, helpful, and dare I even say enjoyable!

Very Best!
Mark Poniatowski (DAD with CAD)

8 thoughts on “About

  1. Mark my name is Scott your sister in law has been taking care of me for 14 years and she led me to your blog. I had a huge heart attack at 31 and had open heart and my kids were 3 and 5 to. I would love to talk to you if you would like. Please write me or get my number from Tonya if you would like. I been dealing with this for long time and thought maybe I could give you help. Hope to talk sometime

    Liked by 1 person

    • Scott, thank you for reaching out. I would love to hear more about your story, and your voyage over the last 14 years. I’m sure that you can help me understand some of what you went through, and what the road ahead looks like. I will reach out to Tanya and get your information so we can connect (by the way, Tanya is the best! You are lucky).

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  2. Mark, I am so glad you are sharing your story. I am even happier that you are figuring out ways to live your life as normally as you were prior to finding out anything was wrong. My mom had 100% blockage in her LAD at the age of 44. She coded on the way to the hospital and they were able to save her life with TPA. This was in 1996, Christmas Day. The TPA saved her life but made it to unsafe to do her heart cath until 24 hours later. This caused heart damage somewhere between 45-55%. The doctors gave her 2 years to live. Thankfully, it will be 20 years this Christmas. She learned through cardiac rehab what you did. She has amazed the doctors with her abilities to this day. I am happy that your cardiologist was keen enough to check everything out and not let you leave that hospital without figuring it out. I am a nurse now and always an advocate for following the ‘something is not right’ gut feeling. Especially when it comes to atypical symptoms of heart disease. God has richly blessed you and your family obviously. I am so glad your heart ais healthy and undamaged from the sounds of it. Take care.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for sending and sharing Erika! Your Mom’s story are exactly what people in my situation want and need to hear! I’m glad to hear that she is doing well (and thriving) 20 years later. Here’s to another 20+ years!

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  3. While I’m sorry this happened I’m glad to see a younger guy sharing his story with CAD. When I was in cardiac rehab I felt similar even though I’m your senior at the age of 47. I felt just this side of “young” while I was working out with men and women in their 60’s & 70’s. The was however one fella who had had a heart attack at the age of 31 who graduated from the cardiac rehab program while I was there. His story became some of my own inspiration at times when I needed it most. There’s definitely healing power in your stories. It answers questions I see from others like “what is the new normal?” “will things ever get better?” and so on… While things may never be the same I like to tell myself and others that it does not have to be a bad thing. We adapt and change and live well through the process. And that’s the best anyone, CAD or not, can hope to achieve.

    Looking forward to following your writing. Be well and stay strong.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Jeff. What you have wrote here is exactly why I started the blog. I hope to help others with those unanswered questions and doubts, even if only a little. Please feel free to share my blog and story. With your permission, I will do the same with yours.

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  4. Mark –
    I was 44 when I had a massive heart attack and went into cardiac arrest at home – on Mother’s Day 2014. My children were 10 and 8 at the time. I write for the Huffington Post sharing my story to educate women, younger adults and encourage everyone to learn CPR. Thank you for being another voice helping to share our cautionary tails!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Leigh! I just find it extremely important to share our stories as young adults with these experiences. There is not enough information out there. Thank you for being a voice on a larger platform as well!

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